Lieff Cabraser Civil Justice Blog
District Court Denies Dismissal in Microsoft Gender Discrimination Lawsuit

District Court Denies Dismissal in Microsoft Gender Discrimination Lawsuit

On March 8, 2016, Judge James L. Robart of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington denied Microsoft’s motion to dismiss the gender discrimination employment lawsuit against the company, brought brought by a former female Microsoft technical professional on behalf of herself and all current and former female technical professionals employed by Microsoft in the U.S. since July 18, 2010. The court ruled that discovery shall proceed based on Plaintiffs’ current class definition, which includes all current and former female technical professionals employed by Microsoft in the U.S. since the July 18, 2010 date.

The court further gave Plaintiffs thirty days to file an amended complaint pleading their disparate impact claim in more detail. The amended complaint will be filed on or about April 7, 2016. You can read a copy of the court’s order here.

Background on the Microsoft Gender Lawsuit

On September 16, 2015, a gender discrimination class action lawsuit was filed against Microsoft Corporation. The class action, Moussouris v. Microsoft Corporation, Case No. 15-cv-01483, was brought by Katie Moussouris, a former female Microsoft technical professional on behalf of herself and all current and former female technical professionals employed by Microsoft in the U.S. since July 18, 2010. On October 27, 2015, an amended complaint was filed, adding current Microsoft employees Holly Muenchow and Dana Piermarini as named plaintiffs, in addition to Ms. Moussouris.

Allegations of Sex Discrimination in the Workplace by Microsoft

The class action complaint alleges that Microsoft has engaged in systemic and pervasive discrimination against female employees in technical and engineering roles (“female technical employees”) with respect to performance evaluations, pay, promotions, and other terms and conditions of employment. The unchecked gender bias that pervades Microsoft’s corporate culture has resulted in female technical professionals receiving less compensation than similar men, the promotion of men over equally or more qualified women, and less favorable performance evaluation of female technical professionals compared to male peers.

Complete case information is available at microsoftgendercase.com.