Lieff Cabraser Civil Justice Blog
Kelly Dermody in the New Yorker on The Tech Industry's Gender Discrimination Problem

Kelly Dermody in the New Yorker on The Tech Industry’s Gender Discrimination Problem

The New Yorker has published a lengthy examination of sex and gender discrimination in the tech industry. Amidst multiple new lawsuits including those filed by Lieff Cabraser against companies like Google and Sandia National Labs, the national media and wider conversations are turning more and more to what will hopefully be a watershed time in bringing long-overdue equality to one of the most important and high-value industries in the world.

The piece focuses on “the imbalance of pay and power that puts men in a position to harass, that gives them unchecked control over the economic lives of women and, as a result, influence over their physical lives,” and notes that the problem “is perhaps nowhere more evident than in the technology industry,“ where a pervasive asymmetry of power is “ripe for abuse.”

Kelly Dermody, the Chair of Lieff Cabraser’s Employment Law group, provided the New Yorker with an overview as well as a path to much-needed change for the industry:

“I think that every major technology company has to be concerned right now. We’ve reached a tipping point. Women are tired of not being taken seriously, and attending ridiculous seminars on how women can get ahead. How about we work on the men? It’s been a long time of talking about skill-building for women, but men aren’t making room, and they’re treating women in a sexualized way and not paying them fairly. And you can never catch up.”

The full article is available online on the New Yorker’s site.

About Kelly Dermody

The Chair of Lieff Cabraser’s employment practice group and Managing Partner of Lieff Cabraser’s San Francisco office, Kelly M. Dermody specializes in class and collective actions on behalf of plaintiffs in employment and consumer cases, including gender discrimination cases against Google, Microsoft, Sandia National Labs and Goldman Sachs. Her additional case work includes wage suppression claims against technology, healthcare, and academic institutions; overtime and lost pay lawsuits for low-wage workers, I/T professionals, and foreign nationals working for American corporations; and ERISA claims that she has tried on behalf of employees and retirees for pension plan abuses.