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Plaintiffs Hot List

The Plaintiffs’ Hot List Award

The National Law Journal has selected Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP as one of the top plaintiffs’ law firms in the nation for over a dozen years. In compiling its annual list, the National Law Journal looks for firms “representing the best qualities of the plaintiffs’ bar.” Below are brief profiles of many of the noteworthy cases our firm litigated that the National Law Journal highlighted in its Hot List awards.


The Plaintiffs' Hot List 2016

Telephone Consumer Protection Act Litigation – TCPA Cases (various). We spearheaded a series of groundbreaking class actions under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (“TCPA”), which prohibits abusive telephone practices by lenders and marketers, and places strict limits on the use of autodialers to call or send texts to cell phones. The settlements in these cases have collectively put a stop to millions of harassing calls by debt collectors and others and resulted in the recovery by consumers across America of over $200 million.


The Plaintiffs' Hot List 2015

In re Toyota Motor Corp. Unintended Acceleration Marketing, Sales Practices, and Products Liability Litigation, MDL No. 2151 (C.D. Cal.). We serve as Co-Lead Counsel for the plaintiffs in the Toyota injury cases in federal court representing individuals injured, and families of loved ones who died, in Toyota unintended acceleration accidents. In December 2013, Toyota announced its intention to begin to settle the cases. Lieff Cabraser played a key role in creating an innovative resolution process that has settled scores of cases in streamlined, individual conferences.


The Plaintiffs' Midsize Hot List 2014

In re High-Tech Employee Antitrust Litigation, No. 11 CV 2509 (N.D. Cal.). We serve as Co-Lead Class Counsel in a consolidated class action charging that Adobe Systems Inc., Apple Inc., Google Inc., Intel Corporation, Intuit Inc., Lucasfilm Ltd., and Pixar violated antitrust laws by conspiring to suppress the pay of technical, creative, and other salaried employees. In September 2015, the Court approved a $415 million settlement with defendants Apple, Google, Intel, and Adobe. Earlier, in May 2014, the Court approved partial settlements totaling $20 million resolving claims against Intuit, Lucasfilm, and Pixar.


The Plaintiffs' Hot List 2013

In re TFT-LCD (Flat Panel) Antitrust Litigation, MDL No. 1827 (N.D. Cal.). We represented direct purchasers in litigation against the world’s leading manufacturers of Thin Film Transistors – Liquid Crystal Displays that are used in flat-panel televisions, computer monitors, smart phones, and other devices. Plaintiffs charged that defendants conspired to fix the prices of TFT-LCD panels for over a decade. The classes reached settlements with all defendants except Toshiba. The case against Toshiba proceeded to trial and the jury returned a verdict for plaintiffs. The case was subsequently settled, bringing the total settlements in the litigation to over $470 million.


The Plaintiffs' Hot List 2012

In re Checking Account Overdraft Litigation, MDL No. 2036 (S.D. Fl.). We serve on the plaintiffs’ executive committee in Multi-District Litigation against the nation’s largest banks for engaging in unfair business practices intended to charge customers multiple overdraft fees on debit card transactions. In 2011, the Court approved a $410 million settlement with defendant Bank of America.


The Plaintiffs' Hot List 2011

In re Broadcom Corp. Derivative Litigation, No. CV 06-3252-R (C.D. Cal.). A federal judge threw out the government’s criminal case against former Broadcom executives and co-founders over an alleged stock-backdating scheme. In the shareholder derivative litigation, however, we served as Lead Counsel and achieved a settlement on the eve of trial valued at $79 million. Combined with an earlier partial settlement with Broadcom’s insurance carriers, the settlements in the case were valued at over $197 million.


The Plaintiffs' Hot List 2010

U.S. ex rel. Hendow v. University of Phoenix, No. 2:03-00457 (E.D. Cal.). The crux of this suit filed under the False Claims Act was the allegation that the University of Phoenix defrauded the U.S. Department of Education by obtaining federal student loan and Pell Grant money based on false statements of compliance with the Higher Education Act. Lieff Cabraser achieved a $78.5 million settlement, a record settlement under the False Claims Act involving fraud and the U.S. Department of Education.


The Plaintiffs' Hot List 2009

Bextra/Celebrex Marketing Sales Practices and Product Liability Litigation, MDL-1699 (N.D. Cal.). Lieff Cabraser was appointed to oversee all personal injury and consumer litigation nationwide arising from the sale and marketing of COX-2 inhibitors manufactured by Pfizer, Pharmacia, and G.D. Searle. The team overcame the fact that the drugs had dissimilar regulatory histories and different liability issues, plus the risk of dismissal on pre-emption grounds. A global resolution resulted in a Pfizer payout of approximately $850 million.


The Plaintiffs' Hot List 2008

Sullivan v. DB Investments, No. 04-02819 (D.N.J.). Lieff Cabraser represented consumers who sued De Beers S.A. in California state court over its alleged conspiracy to monopolize the sale of rough diamonds. The resultant class certification orders were one factor in persuading De Beers to settle. The court granted final approval in May 2010 to a nationwide agreement under which De Beers would pay $295 million.


The Plaintiffs' Hot List 2007

Mraz v. DaimlerChrysler, No. BC 332487 (Cal. Sup. Ct.). Lieff Cabraser obtained a $54.4 million verdict for the family of a man whose Dodge Dakota pickup jumped from park to reverse and backed over him. The jury concluded that the automaker was negligent in designing the vehicle, for failing to warn of the defect, and for failing to issue a recall. The verdict included $50 million in punitive damages.


The Plaintiffs' Hot List 2006

Cox v. Microsoft, No. 105193/00 (N.Y. Sup. Ct.). Lieff Cabraser represented a class of consumers who charged that Microsoft engaged in anticompetitive conduct and/or violated state business practice statutes to harm competition and monopolize the markets for Intel-compatible software. The firm reached a settlement with Microsoft that made up to $350 million in benefits available to New York consumers and businesses.


The Plaintiffs' Hot List 2005

Gonzales v. Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, No. C03-2817 (N.D. Cal.). Lieff Cabraser represented female and minority employees and job applicants who claimed that because they failed to conform to the “A&F Look,” Nordic preppy, they were not hired or were banished to the back room. Abercrombie & Fitch agreed to pay approximately $50 million, including $40 million in damages, and to institute a range of policies and programs to promote diversity among its workforce and to prevent discrimination based on race or gender.


The Plaintiffs' Hot List 2004

Natural Gas Antitrust Cases (Cal. Sup. Ct.). Plaintiffs charged that during the California energy crisis in 2000-2001, El Paso manipulated the market to drive up natural gas prices. In a landmark victory for California residential and business consumers of natural gas, the Court approved a $1.5 billion settlement against El Paso Natural Gas Co.


The Plaintiffs' Hot List 2003

Claghorn v. Edsaco Ltd. (N.D. Cal.). In this securities fraud suit, a federal jury found that Edsaco set up phony companies as part of a scheme to report fictitious sales for another software company, and delivered a $170.7 million verdict agaisnt Edsaco. The verdict included $165 million in punitive damages.

Carver HEARTS

Carver HEARTS

Carver HEARTS Program: Fall 2008 Official Opening

We are pleased to announce the official opening of the Carver Healthy Environments and Response to Trauma in Schools (“HEARTS”) Project. This project was announced in November 2007, and through the hard work of our Steering Committee Members, pro bono attorneys, architects, contractors, and partners at UCSF, the Carver HEARTS Project placed a therapist, Aliya Sheriff, Psy.D., at Carver Elementary at the start of the 2008-2009 school year! We couldn’t have done this without the generous support of all the donors and members of the community who have contributed their time, effort, and money to bring this project to fruition.

Summary Description

Carver HEARTS is a partnership between interested community members, George Washington Carver Elementary School, and UCSF’s Department of Infant, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry to provide a therapist skilled in treating trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on-site at Carver Elementary School. Carver HEARTS will help students and their families address and process the effects of violence exposure on children in the area, allowing for healthier outcomes for the students and the community.

The problem of violence exposure is not a small issue in a school like Carver. In San Francisco’s Visitacion Valley Middle School, where (like Carver) students come from comparable neighborhoods in the Bayview, Hunters Point and Visitacion Valley, nearly 33% of sixth-graders reported in Fall 2006 that they had seen or known someone killed with a gun. See J. Tucker, “Children who survive urban warfare suffer from PTSD, too,” San Francisco Chronicle (Aug. 26, 2007). The effect of such experiences can be devastating, particularly if untreated.

In fact, child experts nationally report that as many as one-third of children living in our country’s violent urban neighborhoods have PTSD – or nearly twice the rate reported for troops returning from war zones in Iraq. Id. Nevertheless, according to the San Francisco Chronicle, PTSD in children is generally “undiagnosed, untreated and almost completely off the radar for policymakers and education officials.” Id. The consequences of ignoring this problem are obvious and devastating. Without this project, however, it is safe to say that virtually none of the children who need this assistance at Carver will receive it. And this is a shame because Carver children are so worth caring about.

Carver is a kindergarten-to-5th grade public elementary school just a few blocks off the T-third line in the Bayview/Hunter’s Point neighborhood, and about 2.5 miles from AT&T Park. Principal Emily Wade-Thompson has been at the school for almost 34 years. She puts her whole heart and soul into the place, and the environment is respectful, warm, and positive. About half of the roughly 265 students come from public housing projects;1 85% of them are African American; a substantial number are in foster care. The average annual household income is very low. Carver parents generally do not have the resources to fund a project like this.

But this is where we come in. It only takes approximately $60,000 annually to fund the salary and benefits for our Carver HEARTS therapist. Through our fiscal sponsor, UCSF Foundation, all donations to Carver HEARTS are 100% tax deductible. Once funded, the therapist will be hired and supervised by Dr. Miriam Martinez, head of UCSF’s Department of Infant, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. And everyone involved is committed to making this a multi-year commitment to ensure the project’s long-term success.

The expected deliverables are quite straightforward. For many children, it will simply allow them for the first time to attend school in the peaceful state of mind necessary for them to experience the opportunities that a public education can provide. Over the long-term, the consequences may be more profound. These include fewer behavioral problems, higher high school graduation rates, lower teen pregnancy, fewer repeated grades, fewer referrals to special education, and fewer disciplinary problems. See L. Karoly, et al., Investing in our Children: What We Know and Don’t Know About the Costs and Benefits of Early Childhood Interventions, RAND (1998). The cost-benefit analysis leads to obvious conclusions. Only there has been no one to fund this benefit. Until now.

If you have not already made a tax deductible donation to Carver HEARTS, there are two ways to donate:

1. Checks made payable to “UCSF Foundation” (re “Carver HEARTS”) and sent to:

Kelly M. Dermody
Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP
275 Battery Street, 30th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94111

Or

UCSF Foundation
Re: Carver HEARTS
220 Montgomery Street, 5th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94104

2. Online donations by credit card at: https://makeagift.ucsf.edu/

Please note: The website has two drop down bars to make sure the gift goes to the correct place:

  • On the “Designate your gift to one of the following areas” drop down menu, please select Neurology and Psychiatric Programs.
  • On the “Select a fund within that area” drop down menu, select Carver HEARTS Program.

If you have questions, please contact Kelly Dermody at (415) 956-1000 ext. 3333.

Carver Hearts Background

I. What is the Carver HEARTS Project?

Carver Healthy Environments and Response to Trauma in Schools (“Carver HEARTS”) Project is a partnership between interested community members, George Washington Carver Elementary School, and UCSF Medical School to provide a therapist skilled in treating trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on-site at Carver Elementary. The project was announced in October 2007, and work commenced in early 2008. Carver HEARTS helps students and their families address and process the effects of violence exposure on children in the area, allowing for healthier outcomes for the students and the community. All funding for Carver HEARTS is being provided by the private community.

The Carver therapist is hired and supervised by Dr. Miriam Martinez (one of the area’s leading experts on childhood trauma issues) and her staff at USCF’s Department of Infant, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. The therapist works in cooperation with Carver Principal Emily Wade-Thompson, a chief proponent of the project. Ms. Wade-Thompson has been affiliated with Carver Elementary for approximately 34 years.

II. What is the population to be served?

This project primarily serves students and their families at George Washington Carver Elementary in the Bayview/Hunters Point neighborhood of San Francisco. Carver is a kindergarten through fifth grade school. Approximately one-half of the 265 students live in public housing1; roughly 85 percent are African American. The school has one of the highest rates of children in foster care in the District, and Carver parents do not independently have the financial resources to fund this type of project. Likewise, the school lacks the expertise and resources to provide this type of specialized treatment, and there are few providers in the neighborhood addressing trauma treatment for children.

The problem of violence exposure is not a small issue in a school like Carver. In San Francisco’s Visitacion Valley Middle School, where (like Carver) students come from comparable neighborhoods in the Bayview, Hunters Point and Visitacion Valley, nearly 33% of sixth-graders reported in Fall 2006 that they had seen or known someone killed with a gun. See J. Tucker, “Children who survive urban warfare suffer from PTSD, too,” San Francisco Chronicle (Aug. 26, 2007). The effect of such experiences can be devastating, particularly if untreated. In fact, child experts nationally report that as many as one-third of children living in our country’s violent urban neighborhoods have PTSD – or nearly twice the rate reported for troops returning from war zones in Iraq. Id. Nevertheless, according to the San Francisco Chronicle, PTSD in children is generally “undiagnosed, untreated and almost completely off the radar for policymakers and education officials.” Id. Moreover, experts on childhood trauma recognize, “PTSD basically feeds on avoidance. The more you avoid it, the worse it gets.” Id. Thus, the consequences of ignoring this problem are obvious and devastating.

Carver HEARTS is an attempt to break the cycle of negative consequences from childhood violence exposure. Without this project, it is safe to say that virtually none of the children who need this assistance at Carver will receive it.

III. Project Funding

Carver HEARTS funds the salary and benefits of the therapist at Carver Elementary. A professional with the skill set necessary to succeed in this project requires an annual salary and benefits package of at least $60,000, plus $3,000 in materials and overhead. UCSF has agreed to serve as our fiscal sponsor and all donations are tax deductible. Since the project was announced to the public in late October 2007, the organizers of Carver HEARTS have raised all of the first year (2008-2009) salary, and about 65% of year two (2009-2010), and continue to pursue individual donations and private funding. The organizers are committed to private fundraising for this project for at least the next 2-3 years, if not longer, with the intention to encourage substantial public funding by years 4 or 5.

IV. Expected Service and Outcomes

The Carver HEARTS psychologist has clinical experience treating children who are survivors of severe trauma, as well as domestic violence, physical, sexual, and emotional abuse. The psychologist’s services include individual, family and group therapy. The psychologist has expertise and knowledge of San Francisco County services and resources for children, youth and families, experience providing case management services, and knowledge of coordinated care to the population served through UCSF/San Francisco General Hospital Department of Psychiatry, Child and Adolescent Services (“CAS”). The psychologist works closely with related child service agencies, including Human Services Agency, SFUSD, and Primary Care Providers. The psychologist is available on site at Carver Elementary Monday through Friday, with hours that will accommodate individual, family and group work (e.g., during and after school hours).

The objective of this position is to decrease the traumatic impact of domestic and community violence on school aged children and their families. The end results would include:

  • increasing the child’s ability to function in social and academic settings,
  • achieving developmental milestones appropriate to age and culture,
  • decreasing stress caused by ongoing family violence and conflict, and
  • improving family functioning.

We estimate that the HEARTS Psychologist will deliver direct mental health services to approximately 70 students ( more than one-third of the Carver population) annually. This will include 25 hours a week of individual, group and or family therapy. The HEARTS clinician will provide 3 groups (serving 12-18 children) on site at Carver Elementary over the course of the school year. Each group will consist of 4-6 children who have been identified by the teachers and the psychologist as needing help with reducing anxious and disruptive behaviors in order to focus in the classroom setting. In addition, the psychologist will assess the need for and provide referrals to psychiatry or psychological testing, and advocate for greater levels of services if indicated. In addition, the HEARTS clinician will deliver on site school intervention in the event of a school crisis. The HEARTS psychologist will deliver at least four talks to the Carver staff and faculty annually and provide on going consultation to the school staff and faculty.

As part of the clinical evaluation of clients served, the following measures will be administered at the beginning of treatment, at four month intervals, and at the end of treatment: Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist or Youth Self Report (measures general behavioral problems and strengths); Briere Traumatic Symptoms Checklist for Children (measures post trauma symptoms); and the UCLA PTSD Index for DSM-IV (measures symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder). In addition, questionnaires will be completed at the beginning of treatment which include information such as the following: demographic information, psychosocial/environmental stressors, trauma history, psychological and psychiatric symptoms, impact of problems on functioning (indicators of severity of problems), previous use of psychosocial services and interventions, and medical history.

Follow-up questionnaires will also be completed at four month intervals after initial assessment and at termination of treatment which will capture the following domains: psychological and psychiatric symptoms; impact of problems on functioning (indicators of severity of problems); use of other psychosocial services and interventions; and type and quantity of services provided. These measures and questionnaires will be used in treatment planning and in tracking client progress toward treatment goals. They will also enable us to better understand the demographic and psychosocial characteristics of clients served, as well as better understand the nature of the presenting problem (e.g., chief complaint) and/or the types of services that appear to be related to the psychosocial outcome of patients receiving psychotherapy.

We showed the following results in Year One:

  1. Increase in the number of traumatized children served;
  2. Increase in treatment retention over normal outpatient therapy in a clinic, with retention of at least 75% of children in therapy for at least two months;
  3. Increase in consistency of treatment, with at least 75% of clients coming to 75% of their scheduled sessions per month;
  4. Improvement in symptoms over the course of treatment, as measured by the standardized measures and questionnaires (although depending upon ongoing or new psychosocial/environmental stressors or traumas, symptoms can sometime worsen even when treatment is productive).

V. How to donate | more information

Tax deductible donations may be made as follows:

A. Checks made payable to “UCSF Foundation” (re “Carver HEARTS”) and sent to:

Kelly M. Dermody
Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP
275 Battery Street, 30th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94111

Or

UCSF Foundation
Re: Carver HEARTS
220 Montgomery Street, 5th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94104

B. Online donations by credit card at: https://makeagift.ucsf.edu/

Please note: The website has two drop down bars to make sure the gift goes to the correct place:

  • On the “Designate your gift to one of the following areas” drop down menu, please select Neurology and Psychiatric Programs.
  • On the “Select a fund within that area” drop down menu, select Carver HEARTS Program.

For more information, please contact Kelly Dermody at (415) 956-1000, ext. 3333.


1. The public housing facilities where Carver students live are notoriously bad, and among the worst in the Bay Area. See, e.g., H. Knight, “Ceiling break at public housing unit draws Third World comparison,” San Francisco Chronicle (Nov. 16, 2007) (describing sewage leak onto 6-year old Carver student).

General Staff

General Staff Positions

Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

We respect the right of every person to participate in all aspects of employment without regard to gender, race, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, age, marital status, sexual orientation, pregnancy, disability, citizenship, veteran status, gender expression and/or identity, or any other status or characteristic protected by federal, state, or local law.

Summer Associate Positions

Summer Associate Positions at Lieff Cabraser

Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Attorneys – Position(s) Available

2018 Summer Associate Program

The firm is now accepting applications for Summer 2018.  Interested candidates should submit applications online via this link. The Summer Associate Program is located in the San Francisco office only.

Brendan P. Glackin, Esq.
Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP
Suite 2900
Embarcadero Center West
275 Battery Street
San Francisco, CA 94111-3339
Telephone: (415) 956-1000
Facsimile: (415) 956-1008

Associate Attorney Positions

Associate Attorney Position

Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP, an a/v-rated plaintiffs’ litigation firm, seeks attorney with 2-4 years’ experience to complement busy practice group focusing on consumer fraud.  Ideal candidate must demonstrate excellent research, writing and analytical skills, along with the ability to assume significant case responsibilities. Top academic credentials preferred.

Lieff Cabraser offers a thriving litigation practice with a competitive salary and excellent benefits package.

Resumes in confidence to:

Brendan P. Glackin
Hiring Partner
Lieff, Cabraser, Heimann & Bernstein, LLP
275 Battery St., 29th Fl.
SF, CA 94111.
Email: jobs@lchb.com.

We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.  No phone calls or agencies, please.

About Lieff Cabraser

Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP is a seventy-plus attorney law firm that has represented plaintiffs nationwide since 1972. We have offices in San Francisco, New York, Nashville, and Seattle. We represent plaintiffs in class and group actions and in individual lawsuits in cases involving substantial losses. For the last fourteen years, The National Law Journal has selected Lieff Cabraser as one of the top plaintiffs’ law firms in the nation.

Super Lawyers

Super Lawyers

SuperLawyers logo

The annual Super Lawyers lists, published by Thomson Reuters, are a comprehensive and diverse guide to outstanding attorneys from a wide range of practice areas, firm sizes, and geographic regions. Attorneys from this list have obtained the highest degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. They are the top five percent of attorneys in each state, chosen by their peers and through independent research.

Our attorneys have been selected for expertise in the practice areas of antitrust, aviation, civil and human rights, class action, consumer protection, defective products, employment, environmental and toxic torts, personal injury, and securities fraud litigation.

The attorneys from our San Francisco office who have been designated Super Lawyers are Donald C. Arbitblit, William Bernstein, Elizabeth J. Cabraser, Kelly M. Dermody, Nimish R. Desai, Eric B. Fastiff, Brendan P. Glackin, Dean M. Harvey, Lexi J. HazamRichard M. Heimann, Roger N. Heller, Daniel M. Hutchinson, Robert Lieff, Robert J. Nelson, Michael W. Sobol, and Fabrice Vincent.

Donald Arbitblit William Bernstein Elizabeth Cabraser Kelly Dermody Nimish Desai Eric Fastiff Brendan Glackin Dean Harvey Lexi Hazam Richard Heimann Roger Heller Daniel Hutchinson Robert Lieff Robert Nelson Michael Sobol Fabrice Vincent

The attorneys in our New York offices selected as New York Super Lawyers are Daniel P. ChiplockNicholas Diamand, Managing Partner Steven E. Fineman, Wendy R. Fleishman, Rachel Geman, Jonathan D. Selbin, Daniel Seltz, and David S. Stellings.

Daniel P. Chiplock Nicholas Diamand Steven E. Fineman Wendy Fleishman Rachel Geman J_Selbin Daniel Seltz David Stellings

Mark P. Chalos from our Nashville office has been selected as a Mid-South Super Lawyer.

Mark Chalos

In 2014, Ms. Cabraser (for the ninth year) and Ms. Dermody (for the seventh year) were each recognized with additional honors as Top 100 Northern California Super Lawyers, and Top 50 Female Northern California Super Lawyers. Ms. Cabraser has also been repeatedly recognized as one of the Top 10 Northern California Super Lawyers.

Rising Stars

Super Lawyers also recognizes “Rising Stars.” These are attorneys possessing significant achievements who have been practicing law ten or less years. The Rising Stars for Lieff Cabraser selected in the past three years are Kenneth S. Byrd, Douglas Cuthbertson, Lexi J. Hazam, Jason Lichtman, Sarah R. London, Annika K. Martin, Michael J. Miarmi, and Anne Shaver.

The Best Lawyers in America

Best Lawyers

Best Lawyers Law Firm of the YearThe Best Lawyers in America is based on an exhaustive peer-review survey. For the 2016 edition, over 79,000 leading attorneys were eligible to vote, and more than 6.2 million votes were tallied for attorneys in their various practice areas. Lawyers are not required or allowed to pay a fee to be listed in The Best Lawyers in America.

The following Lieff Cabraser attorneys were selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America© 2016: Donald Arbitblit, William Bernstein, Elizabeth Cabraser, Mark Chalos, Nimish DesaiKelly Dermody, Eric Fastiff, Steven Fineman, Rachel Geman, Lexi HazamRichard Heimann, Joy Kruse, Robert LieffRobert Nelson, Jonathan Selbin, Michael Sobol, and Fabrice Vincent.

Donald Arbitblit W_Bernstein Elizabeth Cabraser

Mark Chalos K_Dermody Nimish Desai

Eric Fastiff Steven Fineman Rachel Geman

Lexi Hazam Richard Heimann Joy Kruse

Robert Lieff Robert Nelson Jonathan Selbin

Michael Sobol Fabrice Vincent

Lieff Cabraser is honored to have three attorneys recognized by their peers in voting compiled by Best Lawyers as 2015 Lawyers of the Year:

  • Steven E. Fineman was selected as a 2015 Lawyer of the Year for Mass Tort Litigation – Plaintiffs in the New York City area;
  • Elizabeth J. Cabraser was selected as 2015 Lawyer of the Year for Mass Tort Litigation – Plaintiffs in the San Francisco area; and
  • Richard M. Heimann was selected as 2015 Lawyer of the Year for Litigation- Securities in the San Francisco area.

Firm Brochures Resume

Firm Brochures & Resume

Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP is a sixty-plus attorney law firm with offices in San Francisco, New York and Nashville. We are among the largest law firms in the United States that only represent plaintiffs. Since our founding forty-three years ago, Lieff Cabraser has participated in many of the most important individual and class action lawsuits in the United States, helping recover over $97 billion in verdicts and settlements for our clients.

Employment at Lieff Cabraser

Employment at Lieff Cabraser

Attorneys – Positions Available

General Staff – Positions Available

Lieff Cabraser is committed to diversity in the workplaceLieff Cabraser is committed to building solid business relationships with Disabled Veteran Business Enterprises. If you are a certified Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise and are interested in working with the firm, please contact Michele Lewis.

Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Lieff Cabraser in the Community

Lieff Cabraser in the Community

Lieff Cabraser proudly supports the goals of civil rights, human rights, increased access to legal services, and initiatives by the legal community to improve civil justice.

Lieff Cabraser sponsors the Bay Area Minority Law Student Scholarship Program conducted by the Bar Association of San Francisco (BASF). We also support the National Association for Public Interest Law fellowship program. Fellowships made possible by Lieff Cabraser’s sponsorship have included work at the East Bay Community Law Center in Oakland, California, the Employment Law Center in San Francisco, California, and the NOW Legal Defense in New York, New York.

Lieff Cabraser’s Additional Community Sponsorships

For over 20 years, Lieff Cabraser sponsored the radio series "Perspectives," airing on the public broadcasting station KQED-FM in the San Francisco Bay Area. The series offers listeners social and political opinion on a broad spectrum of contemporary issues. While we are no longer the program’s sponsor, we remain committed to sponsoring public radio. We are sponsoring a wide variety of programs on KQED-FM in 2015.

In 2007, Lieff Cabraser attorneys assisted in the launching of the Carver HEARTS Project. The project is a partnership among interested community members, George Washington Carver Elementary School in San Francisco, and UCSF’s Department of Infant, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. The project provides a therapist skilled in treating trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on-site at Carver Elementary School.

In addition to the above-listed organizations, Lieff Cabraser supports the following:

We have been honored to receive the 2005 AIDS Legal Referral Panel “Firm of the Year” award and the 1998 Navigator of Civil Rights Award presented by the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.