Lieff Cabraser Civil Justice Blog
American Bar Association Names John Spragens a “Top 40 Young Lawyer” for 2018

American Bar Association Names John Spragens a “Top 40 Young Lawyer” for 2018

The American Bar Association (ABA) Young Lawyers Division has selected Lieff Cabraser associate John T. Spragens as a 2018 On the Rise – Top 40 Young Lawyer. The ABA notes the On the Rise award is a testament to Spragens’ superb legal reputation and long-standing service to the public good.

The ABA’s profile of John highlights his representation of plaintiffs in large consumer class action and whistleblower cases in federal courts across the nation. He is currently actively involved in the vast multidistrict litigation against the pharmaceutical industry for its part in creating the nationwide opioid epidemic. John has also represented injured smokers and their loved ones against Big Tobacco, robocall victims in cases under the federal Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), and consumers who purchased exploding Samsung top-load washing machines.

Congratulations to John on this prestigious accomplishment!

About the ABA Young Lawyers Division

The ABA Young Lawyers Division is committed to providing young lawyers and their organizations with various tools and opportunities towards professional and personal success. With over 130,000 members and 300 affiliated groups, the ABA YLD is the largest young lawyer organization in the world. Membership in the division gives young lawyers the resources and tools to navigate new career challenges and build, market and manage their practice.

About John Spragens

John Spragens is an associate in Lieff Cabraser’s Nashville office who represents plaintiffs in class action injury, consumer, and whistleblower litigation against corporations that manufacture dangerous and defective products, conspire to fix prices, and misuse taxpayer funds. A member of the firm’s defective products and personal injury practice groups, he has represented families of deceased smokers in trials in Florida federal court against the tobacco companies for their 50-year conspiracy of misrepresenting the dangers of smoking cigarettes and for intentionally engineering the design of cigarettes to make them more addictive. In 2014, he participated in a tobacco industry trial in which a jury awarded his gravely injured client $27 million in compensatory and punitive damages.