Lieff Cabraser Civil Justice Blog
Dean Harvey Discusses Two-Sided Markets and Antitrust Law at California Lawyers Association Webinar

Dean Harvey Discusses Two-Sided Markets and Antitrust Law at California Lawyers Association Webinar

Lieff Cabraser partner Dean M. Harvey is teaching a webinar on “Antitrust Analysis in Two-Sided Markets” for the California Lawyers Association (CLA) from 12:00-1:00pm on February 21, 2019. The webinar is being put together by the Antitrust, UCL & Privacy Section of the CLA and will feature a panel discussion that will explore the treatment of two-sided markets in antitrust law, with an emphasis on how the Supreme Court’s recent decision in Ohio v. American Express has been interpreted by courts and invoked by litigants thus far, and how the case is likely to shape legal theories and analysis in antitrust cases going forward.

View the full program description on the California Lawyers Association site.

About Dean Harvey

A partner in Lieff Cabraser’s San Francisco office, Dean Harvey represents individuals and companies in antitrust, business tort, employment, and intellectual property litigation. His cases seek to remedy and prevent wrongful conduct by dominant firms. These precedent-setting lawsuits concern a wide variety of industries and markets. Remedies include reimbursing purchasers who have overpaid for price-fixed products; preventing monopolists from stifling innovation and eliminating competition; and obtaining damages for businesses, inventors, and copyright owners.

Mr. Harvey was a leader in the High-Tech Antitrust class action against Google, Apple, Intel and other tech giants for allegedly conspiring to suppress the mobility and compensation of their technical employees. This landmark case resulted in the largest recovery (by far) of any class action asserting antitrust claims in the employment context: $435 million. Mr. Harvey continues the fight to ensure that employees receive competitive compensation, currently representing a doctor in a class action alleging an unlawful no-hire agreement between the medical schools of Duke University and the University of North Carolina.