Lieff Cabraser Civil Justice Blog
David Stellings Discusses Plaintiff Perspectives on Multidistrict Litigation at University of Miami School of Law Class Action Forum

David Stellings Discusses Plaintiff Perspectives on Multidistrict Litigation at University of Miami School of Law Class Action Forum

On January 24, 2020, Lieff Cabraser partner David S. Stellings spoke at The University of Miami School of Law’s 2020 “Class Action & Complex Litigation Forum.” David and several other legal experts were featured on the panel “MDL—Who Wants One? Plaintiff, Defense and Judicial Perspectives on MDL Pros and Cons.”


David S. Stellings, second from right.

The Miami Law Class Action and Complex Litigation Forum was designed to offer a unique perspective for attorneys looking to understand the latest issues and topics associated with multi-district class actions and complex litigation. Originally the brainchild of three leading Miami firms in trial, appellate, and class action law, the forum brings together leaders in the legal, political and academic spheres to educate the public on how to better utilize and understand class actions.

View the full Univ. of Miami “Class Action & Complex Litigation Forum” agenda here.

About David Stellings

David S. Stellings represents consumers and small businesses from around the world in complex litigation in federal and state courts. For the last twenty-five years, Stellings has focused on consumer fraud, financial fraud, and breach of contract cases. Stellings’ clients and class members have received more than $12 billion as a result of his advocacy.

Mr. Stellings was part of the leadership team in the Volkswagen “Clean Diesel” multidistrict litigation, in which plaintiffs alleged that Volkswagen intentionally and systematically cheated its customers, lied to the government, and misled the public about the emissions of its diesel engine vehicles sold under the Volkswagen, Audi, and Porsche brands. In October 2016, the Court granted final approval to a settlement relating to 2.0-Liter engines worth approximately $10 billion, and in May 2017 the Court granted final approval to a settlement with VW for 3.0-Liter engines with an estimated value between $1.2 and $4 billion, and a separate settlement with Bosch valued at $327.5 million over its designing of the “defeat device” software in the affected VW vehicle engines.

Mr. Stellings also is on the leadership team in a case against various automakers who allegedly cheated fuel economy tests for certain gasoline-powered vehicles, and as a result, represented to regulators and consumers that the vehicles could obtain better fuel economy than they actually could.  The litigation and intensive settlement negotiations resulted in a non-reversionary $96.5 million settlement that provides class members “full compensation”—i.e., 100¢ on the dollar—for their alleged losses.  The settlement received preliminary approval, and the final approval hearing is scheduled for February 2020.