Personal Injury

Talcum Powder Ovarian Cancer

Talcum powder has been used by women and girls for decades in what was thought to be a harmless method of absorbing moisture. Now, multiple U.S. jury verdicts linking regular use of Johnson & Johnson talcum powder to ovarian cancer highlight potentially fatal risks from talcum powder products. As alleged in lawsuits against talc manufacturers, these cancer risks were concealed from consumers, a “failure to warn” that has led to cancer-related injuries and deaths from talc exposure.

Contact a Lawyer About Your Case

If you or a friend or family member is a long-time daily user of talcum powder products (10 years or more) and have received a diagnosis of ovarian cancer or fallopian tube cancer, you have the right to seek fair compensation for your injuries.

All our lawyers and staff working on these cases are female

Please contact us using the form below or by calling Wendy Fleishman at 1 800 541-7358. We will help affected persons and families gather the information and file the claims needed to seek recompense for any injuries, suffering, or related harm. We will review your claim for free, confidentially, and with no obligation on your part.


First Name (required)

Last Name (required)

Email address (required)

Telephone

State

How did you find our site?

Are you currently represented by an attorney?

Please tell us which talc product(s) you were using:

Please describe any illness or related symptoms you have experienced that you believe may be related to your use of talc:

Additional comments:

Please sign me up for your Consumer Law newsletter. Yes


How Can Talcum Powder and Talc Cause Injuries?

Talcum powder is made of talc. Talc is a fibrous mineral composed of magnesium, silicon and oxygen which absorbs moisture. In its natural form, some talc contains asbestos, a known carcinogen. Commercial sellers of talcum powder claim their products have been asbestos-free since the 1970s, but even without asbestos, talcum is known to potentially cause inflammation in persons exposed and inflammation of human tissue that can cause cancer. Talc can reach the ovaries by traveling up through the vagina, into and through the uterus and Fallopian tubes and into the ovaries, where it causes inflammation.

Dr. Daniel Cramer, a Harvard University epidemiologist who has helped ovarian cancer victims, first wrote about the association between talc and ovarian cancer in 1982 and has published several studies since. Dr. Cramer’s work suggests that talc exposure significantly increases a woman’s risk of serious invasive ovarian cancer.